Fall Gardening 2013

This year we got lucky here in Northeast Ohio and didn’t get our below freezing weather until late October.  But I wasn’t worried about it (OK, maybe a little) because I already had my fall gardening plan in play.  Back in August and September, I prepped several areas (including my summertime potato/pumpkin patch) and planted some fall crops, including purple top turnips, peas, onions, carrots, mustard, spinach, and corn salad (aka mache).  All of these can handle and even thrive in cool temperatures and occasional frosts.  When you add in my already growing Swiss chard, Jerusalem artichokes, leeks, and various herbs, this fall will be delicious right up to Christmas and beyond. Makes me feel a little sorry for those gardeners who till up their gardens in the fall and wait until next May to plant again (like my next door neighbors).

Garden as of November 1, 2013
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Garden as of 7/29/2013
Turnips, Peas, and Corn Salad – 11/4/2013
Dragon Tongue Mustard going to seed – 11/4/2013

This spring, I let my overwintered corn salad go to seed, spreading some of the spent plants all around my garden during May (call me Snarky Mache Seed).  This August, I noticed little corn salad plants growing all over, as some chillier weather woke up the seeds just as my summer plants were winding down.  Corn salad is probably the most cold weather adapted crop I have in my garden and will be available for eating all the way into January.  My evil plan this year was to get it established so it would just come up on it’s own year after year.  I just love perennials (even when they aren’t technically considered as such).  My logic is that if I’m going to have “weeds” come up in my garden, they should be edible.

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Nice examples of corn salad in my garden – April 2013
Corn salad spontaneously growing around corn – 11/4/2013

Besides the planting and harvesting, I also have one other major garden activity – leaf mulching.  I bought a lawn sweeper last year so I could fill my garden with them (including some new areas that had previously been lawn). The effort was quite the success as my weeds were down (except in the back where the leaves were scarce) and my soil seemed to get better. This year I’m making concerted effort to pile the leaves around as evenly as possible so I can spread the wealth, so to speak. I even piled them up on my new garlic bed, located outside the fence to the west of my garden. Even the groundhogs won’t bother garlic so it made no sense to grow it inside like I did this past year. And of course, unlike last year, I remembered to split up the bulbs into cloves and only planted the biggest.

Fall leaves soon to be garden mulch – 11/4/2013
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Lawn Sweeping on 11/9/2013

 

Seed Saving 2013

With the start of fall comes my seed saving efforts.  With a bounty of seeds, I’ve been considering setting up some type of Internet-based sales site, but that might have to wait until late in 2014.  For now, I’m going to limit my myself to trading, swapping, and time credits from the Kent Community TimeBank.

Tomatoes:

Sylvia’s Amish Low Acid Red

Chocolate Cherry

Snarky Orange Cherry
F3 of Sun Gold (F1)

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Tomato Seed Saving technique
Peppers:

Jalapeno (from my AeroGarden)

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Beans:

Jacob’s Cattle Dry

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Rattlesnake Pole – both green and dry

I grew Rattlesnake beans up my corn and my tomato cages this year.

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Rattlesnake Pole beans on my corn – 7/17/2013
Tendergreen Bush – green

Bean: Tendergreen Improved image

Mustard:

Ho-Mi Z (Dragon Tongue)

Turnips:

Seven Top

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Seven Top Turnips going to seed

Lettuce:

Amish Deer Tongue

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Amish Deer Tongue lettuce going to seed.