All posts by thesnarkygardener@gmail.com

How To Avoid Weeds In Your Garden

The Snarky Gardener tells you how to avoid weeds in your garden so you can do less work and produce more food.
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Several of the Snarky Gardener’s weed avoiding techniques are shown in this picture.

People and weeds have been enemies since the beginning of time. You plant the things you want and other plants have the audacity to grow instead.  Ever wonder why this is the case? Are there techniques you can use to lower or even eliminate the problem?  Of course there are – why else would I be writing this article?  (OK, maybe just to hear myself type, as my ego does take over at times).

Let’s start by understanding what weeds are.  In nature (and yes, your garden is in nature, despite what you try to do
to make it not so), weeds are used to cover and repair disturbances – fires, landslides, tree uprootings, volcanoes, sharknadoes, etc.  Bare soil is bad as the sun will damage it and water will wash it away.  Weed seeds are designed to sit in the soil for years and decades, just waiting for such an event.  Then they spring to action, coming up fast and producing lots and lots and lots of seeds.  After a year or two of this, other bigger species come in to take over (brambles, bushes, small trees, and eventually a whole forest).

When we till the soil, we are causing a giant disturbance.  It helps to cause this explosion of activity which our annual garden vegetables like, especially the cabbages (aka brassicas – kale, mustard, turnips, collards, broccoli).  Yes, I just called the vegetables we love to eat “weeds”.  Several years ago was my worst season for weeds.  It was also the last time I tilled my entire garden space.  Coincidence?  I think not.  So what can we smarter gardeners do about the weeds?

Weed avoidance strategies

1.  Don’t Till Very Much

Tilling should be kept to a minimum in your garden.  If you are converting lawn or have some really compacted soil, then till away.  I gave up my tiller a few years back and now use a broadfork instead.  It’s still technically tilling but it’s gentler (especially to the worms) and you can only do so much damage by hand (pant, pant, pant).  And to keep the soil from getting compacted in the first place, don’t step on the places where you want to grow stuff. Plan out your garden so it flows naturally, and then create permanent beds and paths.

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Using my broadfork Big Blue

2.  Use Mulch

Mulch is one of nature’s greatest inventions against weeds.  Weed seeds need light to grow and mulch keeps the sun away from them (be it leaves, straw, hay, food scraps, wood chips, newspaper, cardboard, or even man-made materials like plastic).  Plus organic mulch will break down and become more soil, helping your plants in the future.  Also, mulch not only your planting beds but your paths too.  Stomping on weeds keeps them at bay, but some actually prefer compacted soil.

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Great way to collect free mulch.

 

3.  Grow Cover Crops

Cover crops, like clover or mustard, will cover the ground and compete with weeds while making your soil better.

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Covering the soil, fixing nitrogen, and beautiful too! Also, the seedy looking plants behind the clover are corn salad going to seed, which is making an on purpose weed.

 

4.  Identify and Utilize Your Current Weeds

Have you ever looked up your garden weeds to see if they are edible or have other uses?  There are plant identification groups on the Internet (Facebook, etc) that will help you to figure out what your weeds are.  For example, I had one particularly obnoxious weed that would grow before anything else and would compete with my veggies.  Took me 2 years to ID it, but I finally confirmed that it was Quick Weed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galinsoga_parviflora), an edible plant.  Now I just eat it.

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Lambs Quarters – a great wild edible “weed”

5.  Make Your Own Weeds

If you let your plants go to seed, especially the leafy green ones, you can establish your own edible ‘weeds”.  I currently have oregano, lemon balm, corn salad, turnips, mustard, and several others that just come up all over the garden.  Some are the first to be eaten in the spring before other less evolved gardeners are even planning their spring tilling.  Some people see these plants as “invasive”, but I just think of them as perennial annuals.

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Lots of “weedy” corn salad (aka mache)

Happy Gardening!

Kent Ohio Food Not Lawns 1st Annual Seed Swap

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1st Annual Seed Swap

Kent Free Library
312 West Main Street
Kent, OH 44240
Upstairs Meeting Room

March 7, 2015 – 11 AM to 2 PM

Bring your saved and leftover purchased seeds to trade with others

Come meet other gardeners in the community and make some new gardening friends.

Donated seed will be available for those without seeds to trade.

Please bring a potluck dish to share.

Email don@kofnl.org with any questions

Akron’s Seed Sharing Library

The Snarky Gardener spent an evening with the Akron-Summit County Public Library’s Seed Sharing Library

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On a random visit to the the Akron-Summit County Public Library, I discovered their seed library in the Science and Technology Division at their Main Branch in downtown Akron. A seed library is a collection of packaged seeds that can be “checked out” by community members.  Up to six packets of seeds a month may be checked out. Borrowers are encouraged to return seed saved out of their gardens at the end of the season but it’s not required.  Some plants that are straight forward to save seeds from, like tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, beans, and peas, are marked as “easy to save”.

With my Kent Ohio Food Not Lawns involvement, I have done research on seed libraries with thoughts of possibly starting one here in Kent. Currently there are efforts by state departments of agriculture to close down such libraries as they violate laws that were written for large scale seed producers.  The issue seems to be not the lending but the receiving of seeds back.  The concern is that the seeds of noxious or poisonous plants will be slipped into the system by unscrupulous people and that all seeds need to be professionally tested.  At this writing, there have been cases in at least 3 states – Pennsylvania, Minnesota, and Maryland. In the Pennsylvania case, the library compromised with the Department of Agriculture by agreeing to host several seed swaps a year instead.

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A few weeks after my initial visit, I returned to the Seed Sharing Library, this time as a volunteer helping to split out donated seed into smaller packets. Most commercial packets have many seasons of seeds and can be divided into 4 or 5 packets without issue. Six of us spent 3 hours splitting out just a third of the donated and purchased seed. It became very tedious by the time we finished up. Nonetheless, if they have another packing event, I’ll be there with some of my Kent Food Not Lawns members. I’ll also be donating some of my own saved seed, including turnips, beans, tomatoes, and peppers.

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To find out more about the Seed Sharing Library please visit http://www.akronlibrary.org/locations/main-library/science-technology-division/seed-sharing

The Snarky Gardener’s Expansion Plans for 2015

The Snarky Gardener is expanding his food production area in 2015.
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The Snarky Gardener will be a broadforking fool in 2015

The Snarky Gardener is expanding his growing space by 100% in 2015. He has plenty of room east of his current fenced in primary 50 ft X 30 ft garden. The new area will be approximately 60 ft X 20 ft (1,200 square feet). It won’t be fenced in but instead will be planted with vegetables that groundhogs and rabbits find less desirable (see Groundhog Love for the complete list).  Garlic was already planted outside this fence during the fall.   The Snarky Gardener doesn’t usually believe in rototilling as it damages the soil so he will be strategically broadforking just what he needs and when he needs it.  He might also schedule a “broadforking class” a la Tom Sawyer through Kent Food Not Lawns or the Kent Community Time Bank to get additional assistance.

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Unfenced Backyard Garden plan for 2015. The trees are actually pine trees.

Potatoes will be planted next to the garlic in April or so. Since potatoes are in the nightshade family, animals normally leave them alone (unless they are really hungry deer). Tomatoes will be planted along 2 fences (50 foot long and 5 foot tall) running east to west.  These steel fences will be reused to fence in and protect other crops in future seasons. Added in between these tomato rows will be onions, leeks, peppers, and bush zucchini. Members of the Allium family (onions, garlic, chives, leeks) are generally avoided by animals, especially deer and rabbits. Some gardeners will specifically plant garlic around areas they want protected from unauthorized munching. The bush zucchini will be protected with fencing and/or cover until big enough to have protective spines. Years of groundhog intrusions (and watching the neighbor’s unprotected garden) have taught the Snarky Gardener that they won’t seem to mess with the spinier vegetables. Turnips, mustard, and clover will cover any other bare soil as living mulch. Turnips and mustard have been outside the fence for the years now at Snarky Acres without so much as a bite. Clover could be eaten by herbivores, but there’s plenty already out in the yard, so the SG is not concerned.

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Steel fencing used as tomato cages

 

The Snarky Gardener will also be adding more hugelkultur mounds to his property. Last fall, there were 4 raised beds built with much sweat and cursing. At least two more will added to the south of these in the spring. The six plus will be filled with plenty of annuals, including tomatoes, peppers, beans, and greens. There are additional plans to build hugelkultur beds north of the garden where big, giant pine logs (2 feet in diameter) have been attracting groundhogs, poison ivy, and brambles. These logs will be cut up and used to create perennial herb, onion, turnip, and rhubarb beds. All these can handle a little shade as this area is in the 4 to 6 hour daily sunlight realm and should be left alone by the aforementioned plant-eating wild animals.

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Those logs are where the new hugelkultur beds are going in
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Fenced Backyard Garden plan for 2015. The brown rectangles indicate the raised hugelkultur beds.

One more thing: the Snarky Gardener may be adding second-hand vegetables (aka livestock) to Snarky Acres in 2015 and will be writing about it in the spring.